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Episode 20: Non Sequitur (Part I)

16 Dec

We take a magical journey through the informal side of the incredibly broad fallacy/phenomenon known as a non sequitur. We look at some examples of when non sequiturs and their “casual cousins” make their ways into our lives.

The conversation quickly dissolves into common ways people attempt to reach conclusions through faulty means, instead of focusing exclusively on what logicians mean when they say “non sequitur”, which is fine because we plan to do a part II and delve into the formal side of non sequiturs.

Listen to this episode

For those of you who are appalled and disgusted of our treatment of this topic (which, by the way, should be all of you), here are people considerably smarter than us doing a much better job on this topic:

Also check out:

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4 Comments

Posted by on December 16, 2012 in Fallacies, New Episode, Wait What?

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 responses to “Episode 20: Non Sequitur (Part I)

  1. Jim Johnson

    December 17, 2012 at 4:59 am

    Why do you have such a low opinion of your listeners? You started the show with a real “duh” moment when in Carlos Mencia-fashion, you ruined the “joke” by explaining it. Most people know that a score is 20 (not years, specifically… just twenty) and that a fortnight is two weeks. Thank you for insulting us! Why do we still fucking listen to you?

     
  2. nontheology

    December 17, 2012 at 5:48 am

    I neither understand (a) the Carlos Mencia reference nor (b) why you still fucking listen.

     
  3. Robert J. Grieve

    January 20, 2013 at 8:27 am

    Greetings.

    Please do not listen to the trolls. You show is just fine. One correction though: the maggot experiment was performed by Francesco Redi (bell jars and gauze screening) and not by Louis Pasteur (goose necked flasks)

     
    • nontheology

      January 20, 2013 at 4:21 pm

      Ah, thanks for the correction Robert! I must admit to having a terrible memory for European scientists prior to 1900, as well as for different types of glass vessels.

       

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